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NCAA to consider allowing athletes to cash in on their names


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#1 Doug Jolley

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 01:52 PM

Outquote:

NCAA rules strictly prohibit student-athletes in most circumstances from receiving benefits or compensation from their names, images and likenesses from a school or outside source.

The NCAA has a history of coming down on players for receiving compensation.

Donald De La Haye, a former University of Central Florida kicker, had his football scholarship taken away by the school in 2017 because of the revenue he was generating from his YouTube channel. The NCAA determined his videos were a violation of eligibility rules, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

Former Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel got into trouble with the NCAA for allegedly signing autographs for money. He was suspended for the first half of the first game of the 2013 season for violating an NCAA bylaw about athletes' use of names and images, but it was later made clear Manziel didn’t receive money for the autographs.

“While the formation of this group is an important step to confirming what we believe as an association, the group's work will not result in paying students as employees,” Smith said in a statement. “That structure is contrary to the NCAA's educational mission and will not be a part of this discussion.”

https://www.foxnews....rom-their-names

#2 Doug Jolley

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 01:58 PM

I think there are differences. In the two cases cited above, college athletes should not be paid for their autographs. Picture a line of Alabama fans lined up to hand out hundred dollar bills to kids signing something for them. On the other hand, the kicker with the YouTube channel was working -hard -as an entrepreneur. The NCAA should have no say in whether he can have a profitable business just because he’s a college athlete.

What say you?

#3 brat

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:05 PM

Kids are going to spend more time promoting themselves and acting weird to get attention than they will be studying or extra hours honing their craft.

 

I am getting very close to stop watching all sports as college and pros are becoming more the same and I have a general dislike of prima donnas.


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#4 Doug Jolley

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:20 PM

Kids are going to spend more time promoting themselves and acting weird to get attention than they will be studying or extra hours honing their craft.

I am getting very close to stop watching all sports as college and pros are becoming more the same and I have a general dislike of prima donnas.


I fear you are right.

#5 Kiwicock

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:59 PM

That would be opening up a can of worms! So much incentive to go to schools for the wrong reasons...verbal promises during recruiting to highlight them for the financial recognition $$$ that can come their way! I can see just so much going wrong if this came to fruition!
Don’t like it...not up to me though!

#6 SouthernGamecock

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 01:07 PM

Kids are going to spend more time promoting themselves and acting weird to get attention than they will be studying or extra hours honing their craft.

 

I am getting very close to stop watching all sports as college and pros are becoming more the same and I have a general dislike of prima donnas.

 

As much as I wish I could disagree brat, I fear you're correct.  We're approaching tipping points in many areas of society that will reflect a much different world in the not to near future.  The way we're going now, eSports will surpass real ones in the not to distant future in terms of audience and market share :lol:


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#7 LexCock

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 01:29 AM

I think there are differences. In the two cases cited above, college athletes should not be paid for their autographs. Picture a line of Alabama fans lined up to hand out hundred dollar bills to kids signing something for them. On the other hand, the kicker with the YouTube channel was working -hard -as an entrepreneur. The NCAA should have no say in whether he can have a profitable business just because he’s a college athlete.

What say you?

 

I agree with you here, Doug.  The kicker was pretty much punished in a heavy handed manner as far as I'm concerned, thought there would be situations in between the two extremes that would pose some difficulties.


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